At the TPC gourmet table, if Luna Winter exemplified feminine beauty under duress, Susan Strong personified energetic fantasy grappling and Lisa Marie glowed with sensuous Kiwi determination; their beautiful sister Kelly Blair painted erotic elegance with a British lemon twist of athleticism, both shaken and stirred.

It was another Kelly, first name Grace, who wowed the world during the 1950’s with such films as Dial M for Murder and To Catch a Thief who was quoted as saying, “Getting angry doesn’t solve anything.”

When adoring the TPC female wrestling stable during the early 1990’s, what I admired most about Kelly Blair in terms or her fully competitive matches is that she never seemed to get angry. She certainly competed with a team of steam in cute girlies Sonja Vanderbeck and Angela Scott who could bristle from time to time but oddly enough, Kelly never seemed to.

Kelly possessed many strengths that spurred the imagination and the one that tipped my scales of desire was her elegance.

TPC BEAUTIES, LUNA ON THE LEFT, KELLY BLAIR THE RIGHT

fciwomenswrestling.com article, TPC wrestling photo credit

fciwomenswrestling.com article, TPC wrestling photo credit

Kelly truly had a regal look and graceful refinement that I adored. I could see her strolling into a theater, dressed in black, graced with pearl earrings or sipping champagne in white, top to bottom, while the band played on.

She displayed a bold attitude when interviewed by TPC, sitting on the sofa, not shying away from the notion that she didn’t just wrestle erotically to get paid, she actually enjoyed that genre of women’s wrestling matches.

Her grappling engagements included matches against Luna Winter, Anna Michaels, Sonja Vanderbeck, Angela Scott, Susan Strong and Debbie Morgan to cite a few.

Blessed with beautiful, fuller shapely hips, whether she was adorned in pink, white or tiger spotted briefs, Kelly was effective at body scissors and head locks.

Like most of us, she was a product of her time and what a time it was in terms of the changing of the fashion guard that started in England but affected the world. Let’s have Kelly escort and sit with us in a limousine and travel back to Britain in the 1990’s.

It was a time of neons, girly sweats, baseball jackets and baby doll dresses; leotards, leggings, body piercings and long floral skirts; grunge, preppy, sports-inspired, designer, all underpinned by a defiant blurring of sexuality.

Ms. Bel Jacobs in her April 2nd, 2013 piece for metro.co.uk explains, “The 1990s was the era when, arguably, many of today’s most influential figures cut their fashion teeth, so perhaps it’s not surprising designers are returning to the decade. And hindsight is a wonderful thing. What may have looked haphazard and unfocused then has been polished to a fine sheen now.”

fciwomenswrestling.com article, wikipedia photo

fciwomenswrestling.com article, wikipedia photo

It was so aptly stated at www.tate.org.uk, “Since the 1990s, an aesthetic that is particular to London has linked the worlds of fashion, music, design and fine art. It is vernacular, recycled, humorous, and able to draw poetic beauty from the ordinary and humdrum. The city is more than just a platform for international success: it has become a catalyst, a theme, and a source of inspiration.”

As usual, Wikipedia explains it well and in clear simple terms. “In the 1990s it was no longer the done thing to follow fashion slavishly, a sharp contrast to the highly a la mode 1970s and 1980s. The phobia of being underdressed was finally completely displaced by the fear of overdressing.

Fashion in the 1990s united around a new standard, minimalism, and styles of stark simplicity became the vogue. Despite the best efforts of a few designers to keep the flag for pretty dresses flying, by the end of the decade the notion of ostentatious finery had virtually disappeared.

Fashion at the end of the 20th century tackled themes that fashion had not previously embraced. These themes included rape, disability, religious violence, death, and body modification. There was a dramatic move away from the sexy styles aimed at the glamorous femme fatale of the 1980s, and many designers, taken with a vision of romantic poverty, adopted the style of the poverty-stricken waif, dressed in a stark, perversely sober palette, with a face devoid of make-up.

Clothes by ready-to-wear retailers such as The Gap, Banana Republic, and Eddie Bauer came to the forefront of fashion, managing to tap into the needs of women who simply wanted comfortable, wearable clothes. Retro clothing inspired by the 1960s and 1970s was popular for much of the 1990s.

fciwomenswrestling.com article, wikipedia photo

fciwomenswrestling.com article, wikipedia photo

In the 1990s the designer label Prada became a true creative force in the fashion industry.

The British designer Vivienne Westwood produced many influential and popular collections in the early 1990s, which included outfits inspired by 18th-century courtesans and the Marquis de Sade, with rounded hips, corsets, and platform heels.

The London-based designer Rifat Ozbek was also popular, particularly in New York and Milan. His youthful style, which mixed references to India, Africa, and his native Turkey with clever takes on historical clothing, was reminiscent of hippest nightclubs and the more outrageous street fashions of the time.”

It’s easy to forget how we’re all somewhat defined and impacted by the time periods that we live in. When we look back on competitors from the past like Kelly, which is now creeping up on almost twenty years ago, it’s easy to see them in a time warp vacuum through the lens of the present.

In my opinion, the female wrestling world today has clearly become more masculine. FBB’s with feminine muscle abound so the girlie girls have their knickers in a twist and their pretty faces flinching while clutched in arm bars, crushing head locks and flattening body scissors.

In Kelly’s time period it was truly a time of ladies wrestling in competitive but soft settings. Which is preferred; like all art, is simply a matter of taste.

In Gaelic the meaning of the name Kelly is warrior. In Irish the meaning of the name Kelly is: War. Lively. Aggressive.

The cerebral and penetrating site www.sheknows.com takes it much deeper and further surmising, “People with this name have a deep inner desire for travel and adventure, and want to set their own pace in life without being governed by tradition.”

That certainly seems like Kelly Blair.

I miss Kelly Blair.

She was the one that made you wish that you were the world’s greatest photographer who would dress her to the nines in a myriad of styles and get lost in your fantasy shoot.

fciwomenswrestling.com article, wikipedia photo

fciwomenswrestling.com article, wikipedia photo

She was the quiet one with the knowing look in her beautiful dark eyes filled with the history of Great Britain.

True to her heritage, her wrestling was certainly lively and aggressive.

Many women had that. What made hers more relevant, memorable and timeless was her sense of style, eroticism and creativity; all enhanced and refined by eternal elegance.

~ ~ ~

Some may find other women’s wrestling sites erotic in nature. If you are offended by depictions of women wrestling in erotic situations, please exercise caution in visiting women’s wrestling sites.

Kelly’s matches can be found at tpcwrestling.com, an erotic site.

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Sources: brainyquote.com, Wikipedia, fciwomenswrestling.com, fciwomenswrestling2.com, FCI Elite Competitor, https://femcompetitor.com, metro.co.uk, www.sheknows.com, tpcwrestling.com, www.tate.org.uk, photos thank you Wikimedia Commons.